1. CONTINUOUS SENSORS

 

• There are a number of defining properties of interest when considering sensors,

- Accuracy - a sensor will statistically vary about an exact reading. If we take a statistical range for all readings (e.g., ±3 standard deviations) this will be a reasonable accuracy. Accuracy can also be given as a relative value (e.g. percentage)

- Resolution - Typically used for systems that ‘step’ through readings. This is the smallest increment that the sensor can detect.

- Repeatability - When a single sensor condition is made and repeated, there will be a small variation for that particular reading. This is the repeatability.

- Range - Natural limits for the sensor

- Dynamic Response - the frequency range for regular operation of the sensor. Typically sensors will have an upper operation frequency, occasionally there will be lower frequency limits.

- Environmental - temperature and humidity limits exist for many sensors

- Calibration - most sensors require some degree of calibration, and their readings may drift over time.

- Cost

 

 

1.1 INPUT ISSUES

1.2 SENSOR TYPES

1.3 ANGULAR POSITION

1.4 LINEAR POSITION

1.5 VELOCITY

1.6 ACCELERATION

1.7 FORCE/MOMENT

1.8 FLOW RATE

1.9 TEMPERATURE

1.10 SOUND

1.11 LIGHT INTENSITY

1.12 PRESSURE

1.13 PRACTICE PROBLEMS

1.14 REFERENCES

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