1. RAPID PROTOTYPING

 

• The key concept is RAPID - generally this is an all-in-one-step production of a part geometry.

 

• Parts are used for,

- prototypes to allow fast review of part shape, simple assembly, aesthetics, manufacturability, etc.

- low volume production - very small numbers of parts can be made using this technology.

 

• General advantages,

- reduce prototype/production times from months to weeks or days

- a physical model is easier to “sell” to customers and management

- physical models are easier to check for errors. Graphical methods often result in cluttered views

- avoids the high cost of prototype tooling, and allows (more) design iterations

- prototypes costs can be lower than production types

 

• General disadvantages,

- very expensive capital costs

- tolerances are generally >.005”

- primary materials are specialized, and other steps are required to produce metal parts

 

 

1.1 STL FILE FORMAT

1.2 STEREOLITHOGRAPHY

1.3 BONDED POWDERS

1.4 SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING (SLS)

1.5 SOLID GROUND CURING (SGC)

1.6 FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING (FDM)

1.7 LAMINATE OBJECT MODELING (LOM)

1.8 DIRECT SHELL PRODUCTION CASTING (DSPC)

1.9 BALLISTIC PARTICLE MANUFACTURING (BPM)

1.10 COMPARISONS

1.11 AKNOWLEDGEMENTS

1.12 REFERENCES

1.13 PRACTICE PROBLEMS

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